Degree Type: 

Bachelor of Education

Department: 

Department of Science Education

Modes of Study: 

Regular

Entry Requirements: 

Applicants must have passes any three (3) of the following elective subjects: Elective Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

Career Opportunities: 

Science is the organisation of knowledge about the universe through experiments and tests, and using the understanding gained from that to set out methods to solve problems facing mankind. The process of building scientific knowledge does not happen easily, as practical steps are taken to study the materials making up various objects found in the universe.  
 
At the basic and senior high school levels of education, science encompasses physical sciences like biology, chemistry, physics, agriculture, and a few other areas. Learners are taught experimentation methods, exposed to proven scientific theories, and made to understand the reasoning behind some of those theories to equip them for the task of training scientists. Skills such as heightened curiosity, analytical reasoning and creativity are a key focus of the programme. Learners are taught how to adopt scientific models developed from across the world, and localising it for the benefit of mankind in the environments in which they find themselves. 
 
The B.Ed Science programme primarily trains professional teachers to teach science at the senior high school as well as senior high school levels of Education.

Programme Structure

Level 200

Second Semester

CHE 207: Practical Physical/Inorganic Chemistry II
2 Credit(s)

The course will focus on principles taught in CHE 203. Laboratory exercises that will be carried out include: solution properties, kinetics, electrochemical series, equilibrium, acid–base and complexometric titrations, identification of cations and anions, and gravimetric analysis involving separation methods.  

CHE204: Organic Chemistry II
3 Credit(s)

This course introduces students to the structure, physical and chemical properties, synthesis and functional group of organic compounds (alcohols, ethers, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives and amines). It will also introduce students to stereochemistry and chirality of compounds containing one and two asymmetric centres. The simple chemistry of carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids and synthetic polymers will be studied. 

CHE208: Physical Chemistry II
2 Credit(s)

This course deals with the principles of chemical equilibrium, acid and bases, and solubility equilibra. Students will be introduced to the concepts of pKa and pKb as measures of acidic and basic strengths respectively. The solubility of sparingly soluble salts will be discussed.

CHE216: Practical Organic Chemistry
1 Credit(s)

The course introduces students to qualitative organic analysis, and physical and chemical properties of organic compounds. Experiments will be carried out on structural elucidation of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives.

ESC 211: Statistical Methods in Science Education
3 Credit(s)

The course introduces students to the nature of statistics with a description of variables, scales of measurement and the differences between descriptive and inferential statistics. Data representation is treated with emphasis on frequency distributions, histograms, polygons, gives, bar and pie charts as well as box and whisker plots. The nature and role of the measures of location, variability and relative position are explained. Students are introduced to the concept of probability with emphasis on the addition and multiplication rules and the nature, properties and applications of the normal distribution. Measures of relationship and correlation are explained and their roles in education are discussed. Basic ideas about statistical inference (sampling distributions) are treated leading to an introduction to hypothesis testing. Statistical tools such as regression analysis, chi-square test, t-test, Mann-Witney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test. One-way analysis of variance and the Kruskall-Wallis test are mentioned with emphasis on when they can be used.

ESC208: Methods of Teaching Biology
3 Credit(s)

This course requires student-teachers to scaffold learning; practice how to promote active engagement of the learner; expose and discuss common misconceptions; organize the syllabus into schemes of work and further into lesson notes; use assessment as a means of advancing learning; develop effective and interactive teaching techniques and styles; and use collaborative rich tasks to engage science students in co-operative small group work.

ESC209: Methods of Teaching Chemistry
3 Credit(s)

This course requires student-teachers to scaffold learning; practice how to promote active engagement of the learner; expose and discuss common misconceptions; organize the syllabus into schemes of work and further into lesson notes; use assessment as a means of advancing learning; develop effective and interactive teaching techniques and styles; and use collaborative rich tasks to engage science students in co-operative small group work.

The course specifically includes the following topics: Overview of theories of learning and teaching; principles of learning and teaching; various instructional strategies; creating a good teaching environment (including board management, class control and class management); motivation in science teaching; statement of lesson objectives and set induction; lesson  planning; questioning and questioning skills; learning difficulties in chemistry; practical work in chemistry; and use of ICT in teaching chemistry.

ESC210: Methods of Teaching Physics
3 Credit(s)

This course requires student-teachers to scaffold learning; practice how to promote active engagement of the learner; expose and discuss common misconceptions; organize the syllabus into schemes of work and further into lesson notes; use assessment as a means of advancing learning; develop effective and interactive teaching techniques and styles; and use collaborative rich tasks to engage science students in co-operative small group work.

The course specifically includes the following topics: Overview of theories of learning and teaching; principles of learning and teaching; various instructional strategies; creating a good teaching environment (including board management, class control and class management); motivation in science teaching; statement of lesson objectives and set induction; lesson  planning; questioning and questioning skills; learning difficulties in physics; practical work in physics; and use of ICT in teaching physics.

ESC214: Curriculum Studies in Biology
3 Credit(s)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to discuss the Senior High School curriculum in biology, including the basic principles of curriculum development.  Students will be exposed to the factors that influence the development, design, implementation and evaluation of curriculum. 

This course introduces students to the various theories of curriculum development. It covers the various factors that influence curriculum development. Students will learn how to select and organize learning experiences. Curriculum implementation and evaluation will be covered in this course. Students will be exposed to how to interpret the biology syllabus.

ESC216: Curriculum Studies in Chemistry
3 Credit(s)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to discuss the Senior High School curriculum in chemistry, including the basic principles of curriculum development.  Students will be exposed to the factors that influence the development, design, implementation and evaluation of curriculum. 

This course introduces students to the various theories of curriculum development. It covers the various factors that influence curriculum development. Students will learn how to select and organize learning experiences. Curriculum implementation and evaluation will be covered in this course. Students will be exposed to how to interpret the chemistry syllabus.

ESC220: Curriculum Studies in Physics
3 Credit(s)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to discuss the Senior High School curriculum in Physics, including the basic principles of curriculum development.  Students will be exposed to the factors that influence the development, design, implementation and evaluation of curriculum. 

This course introduces students to the various theories of curriculum development. It covers the various factors that influence curriculum development. Students will learn how to select and organize learning experiences. Curriculum implementation and evaluation will be covered in this course. Students will be exposed to how to interpret the Physics syllabus.

MAT202: Vector Algebra and Differential Equations
3 Credit(s)

Vector Algebra with applications to three-dimensional geometry; first order differential equations; applications to integral curves and orthogonal trajectories; ordinary linear differential equations with constant co-efficients and equation reducible to this type; simultaneous linear differential  equations; introduction to partial differential equations.

MAT203: Further Calculus
3 Credit(s)

Differentiation of inverse, circular, exponential, logarithmic, hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic functions; Leibnitz’s Theorem; application of differentiation to stationary points; asymptotes; graph sketching; differentials; L’Hospital rule; integration by substitution, by parts and by use of partial fractions; reduction formulae; applications of integration to plane areas, volumes and surfaces of revolution, arc length and moments of inertia; functions of several variables, partial

PHY202: Electricity and Magnetism
2 Credit(s)

This course is an extension of the electricity and magnetism basics introduced in PHY102.  It is designed to improve students understanding of electric and magnetic phenomena.  The course covers basic computation of electric and magnetic fields, calculation of electric potentials and their applications.  A.C. theory and electromagnetic waves and their related calculations are covered. Application of RCL circuit is discussed.
 

PHY204: Electronics I
2 Credit(s)

This is a foundation course in analogue Electronics and is meant to provide a comprehensive overview of the scope and dynamics of electricity and the fact that electronic refers to a extremely wide range of electrical technology.  Students will be introduces to the building blocks of electronics such as the semiconductor, power supplies, operational amplifiers, attenuators and transducers.  Students will learn the theory and mathematics that govern the workings of the components that make up an electronic system.

PHY206: Electricity and Magnetism Practicals
1 Credit(s)

Electricity and Magnetism Experiments

PHY208: Electronics I Practicals
1 Credit(s)

Electronics Experiments

Level 300

First Semester

BIO 211: Plant Physiology
3 Credit(s)

This course covers basic plant processes including photosynthesis, respiration, fermentation and bioenergetics. Other concepts and topics to be discussed include translocation of organic compounds, germination and dormancy, stomatal physiology and plant growth regulators.

BIO 212: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology
3 Credit(s)

This course introduces students to the basic anatomy and fundamental mechanisms involved in mammalian physiological functions. It includes a study of the structure and function of the organ systems involved in digestion, transport, respiration, co-ordination, excretion, reproduction, support and locomotion. Principles of homeostasis will be emphasised.

BIO201: Basic Soil Science
3 Credit(s)

This introductory course seeks to provide basic information on soil development, emphasizing the soil formation factors and the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils.  The course also emphasizes the special characteristics of clays and humus in relation to plant growth. Soil classification is discussed with emphasis on tropical soils. Land use and soil degradation are discussed with focus on conservation and management.

CHE301: Analytical Chemistry
3 Credit(s)

This course focuses on the fundamental principles of analytical methods in chemistry. Topics to be discussed will include concepts based on analytical sampling, experimental uncertainty, statistical data analysis, glassware and instrument calibration, volumetric analysis, solvent extraction, gravimetry, titrimetry (acid-base, complexometric, precipitation and redox titration), Beer’s law and its related chemical and instrumental deviations. Students will also be introduced to the principles of optical instrumentation, atomic spectroscopy, and chromatographic methods.

CHE319: Practical Organic Chemistry
2 Credit(s)

This course has a link to CHE 104 (Introductory Practical Organic Chemistry) and will enable students to be able to undertake a simple project work in organic chemistry using basic laboratory techniques such as separation, purification and identification of compounds of binary and tertiary mixtures. The course will also offer students the techniques involved in spectroscopic methods for the identification and total synthesis of simple organic compounds.

ESC 203 : Psychological Basis of Science Education
3 Credit(s)

This course is intended to introduce students to theories of learning and development and how they can assist teaching and learning of science.

It will deal basically with the Skinner, Piagetian, Ausubelian, Brunerian, Gagnerian, and Vygotsky theories of learning. General principles of Behaviourism, Cognitivism, and Constructivism will be covered.  Misconceptions and Science Concepts development will also be discussed.

ESC312: Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Chemistry I
3 Credit(s)

This is the first of two courses designed to equip students with pedagogical content knowledge to enable them teach new or perceived difficult topics in the senior high school chemistry syllabus more competently in a variety of ways to reflect students’ different learning styles. Students will be able to develop special amalgam of content and pedagogy that is uniquely the province of teachers.

Appropriate strategies for successful teaching of selected topics, generally, will be discussed. Students will also learn how to recognize opportunities where learners will be encouraged to develop their thinking skills as applied to the study of chemistry. 

ESC316: Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Biology I
3 Credit(s)

This is the first of two courses designed to equip students with pedagogical content knowledge to enable them teach new or perceived difficult topics in the senior high school biology syllabus more competently in a variety of ways to reflect students’ different learning styles. Students will be able to develop special amalgam of content and pedagogy that is uniquely the province of teachers.

Appropriate strategies for successful teaching of selected topics, generally, will be discussed. Students will also learn how to recognize opportunities where learners will be encouraged to develop their thinking skills as applied to the study of biology. 

ESC335: Development of Science Teaching Materials
3 Credit(s)

The aim of the course is to equip students with the skills of designing, developing, improvising and using science teaching materials in the classroom. 

The course gives an in-depth knowledge of the role of science teaching materials in different teaching and learning systems; the designing and development, and use of different types of teaching materials in science teaching. The teaching materials that the course emphasizes are printed and duplicated materials, non-projected materials, still projected materials, educational games, mobiles and computer assisted instruction (CAI).

ESC344: Teaching of Biology Practicals
3 Credit(s)

This course seeks to equip student-teachers with skills to enable them to handle biology practicals competently. Students will be exposed to various ways to inculcate scientific inquiry skills into biology students.

This course introduces students to the various practical and experimental skills. Students will learn how to collect specimen, handle equipment, classify organisms, record and interpret data, and plan and design biology experiments. Students will be taken through how to organize selected biology practicals in the SHS biology syllabus.

ESC346: Teaching of Chemistry Practicals
3 Credit(s)

This course seeks to equip student-teachers with skills to enable them to handle physics practicals competently. Students will be exposed to various ways to inculcate scientific inquiry skills into chemistry students.

This course introduces students to the various practical and experimental skills. Students will learn how to plan and design chemistry experiments, organize and handle equipment, collect data, record data, plot suitable graphs and interpret data. Students will be taken through how to organize selected chemistry practicals in the SHS chemistry syllabus.

ESC348: Teaching of Physics Practicals
3 Credit(s)

This course seeks to equip student-teachers with skills to enable them to handle physics practicals competently. Students will be exposed to various ways to inculcate scientific inquiry skills into physics students.

This course introduces students to the various practical and experimental skills. Students will learn how to plan and design physics experiments, organize and handle equipment, collect data, record data, plot suitable graphs and interpret data. Students will be taken through how to organize selected physics practicals in the SHS physics syllabus.

ESC399: Research Methods in Science Education
3 Credit(s)

This course equips students with relevant research skills to enable them to effectively apply the appropriate methodology in carrying out research in science education. Students will be abreast with modern principles underlying the types of research. Students will also apply appropriate statistical tools in analyzing different science education research data. Students will also be introduced to software packages to help them analyze data.

The following topics will be emphasized: Meaning and purposed of research in science education; types of research in science education; steps in carrying out science education research; Research problem and hypothesis; Pilot studies; Review of literature; and Research methodology. Students will also analyze different types of data using various statistical tools (such as regression analysis, chi-square test, t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, one-way analysis of variance and the Kruskall-Wallis test); evaluation of published articles and referencing.

MAT301: Advanced Calculus I
3 Credit(s)
Pre-requisite: MAT 202 and 203

Limit and continuity of functions of several variables; partial derivatives, differentials, composite, homogenous and implicit functions; Jacobians, orthogonal curvilinear coordinates; multiple integral, transformation of multiple integrals; Mean value and Taylor’s Theorems for several variables; maxima and minima with applications.

MBB309: Introduction to Molecular Genetics
3 Credit(s)

This course focuses on mitosis and meiosis; Mendelian genetics; extensions of the Mendelian genetics;   chromosome mapping in eukaryotes; sex chromosomes and  sex determination; chromosome mutations; DNA structure and analysis; DNA replication and recombination; DNA organization in chromosome; the genetic code and transcription. Translation and proteins, gene mutation and DNA repair, regulation of genes, gene expression in eukaryotes and recombinant DNA technology will be discussed.

PHY303: Thermal Physics
3 Credit(s)

Thermal Physics is an advanced undergraduate course. It connects the world of everyday systems, of astronomical objects, and of chemical and biological processes with the world of molecular, atomic, and electronics systems. The course will be introduced through a unified approach to the equilibrium thermal properties of large systems based on the quantum viewpoint and statistical probability. The laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of entropy, temperature, chemical potential, free energy, and thermodynamic potential will be covered. The heat transfer, phase transition, and classical kinetic theory will be discussed.

PHY309: Atomic and Modern Physics
3 Credit(s)

The Experimental Basis of Quantum Theory: Discovery of the X-Ray and the Electron; Determination of Electron Charge; Line Spectra; Quantization; Black body Radiation; Photo electric Effect (Experimental results of PE; Classical Interpretation; Einstein’s      Theory; Quantum Interpretation); X-Ray Production; Compton Effect; Pair production and Annihilation. Structure of the Atom: The Atomic   Models of Thomson and Rutherford; Rutherford Scattering; The    Classical Atomic Model; Bohr Model; Characteristic X-Ray Spectra and Atomic Number; Atomic Excitation by Electrons. Wave Properties of Matter, X-Ray Scattering; De Broglie Waves; Bohr’s Quantization condition; Electron Scattering ; Wave Motion; Waves or [articles; Relationship Between Probability and Wave Function; Uncertainty Principle. (3hrs) Semiconductor Theory and Devices: Band Theory of Solids; Semiconductor Theory; Semiconductor Devices Diodes, Bridge Rectifiers; Devices Diodes; LED, PV cells, Transistors; FET and MOSFETs, Schottky Barriers; Ics.

Second Semester

MAT302: Advanced Calculus II
3 Credit(s)
Pre-requisite: MAT 301 and MAT 303

 

 

This course covers vector valued functions. It introduces students to the concept of change and motion and the manner in which quantities approach other quantities.  Topics include limits, continuity,  derivatives of vector functions, gradient, divergence, curl, formulae involving gradient, divergence, laplacian, orthogonal curvilinear coordinates,  line integrals, Green’s theorem in the plane, surface integrals. Other topics are the divergence theorem, improper integrals, Gamma functions, Beta functions, the Riemann Stieltjes Integral,  pointwise and uniform convergence of sequence and series, integration and differentiation term by term.

Limits, continuity and derivatives of vector functions; gradient, divergence and curl; formulae involving gradient, divergence, curl and laplacian and orthogonal curvilinear coordinates; line integrals; Green’s theorem in the plane; surface integrals; the divergence theorem; improper integrals; Gamma and Beta functions; The Riemann Stieltjes integral; pointwise and uniform convergence of sequence and series; integration and differentiation term by term.

PHY 206: Electricity and Magnetism Practicals
1 Credit(s)

Electricity and Magnetism Experiments        
 

CHE310: Practical (Physical/Inorganic) Chemistry II
2 Credit(s)

The course will expose students to preparation of standard reagents and inorganic complexes. Other experiments will focus on determination of heat of combustion, phase rules and concepts related to chemical kinetics. The use of other analytical methods such gravimetric methods, complexometric titrations, electrochemical and spectroscopic methods will be performed.

CHE318: Organic Reactions Mechanism I
2 Credit(s)

This course is intended to give students an insight into the principles governing how and why organic chemical reactions take place, as well as, the survey of preparative methods in organic chemistry and their application to the synthesis of complex molecules. It will largely focus on the development of novel synthetic methods and applications of these in target synthesis, most often either natural products or biologically active compounds of pharmaceutical or agrochemical significance. Nucleophilic, electrophilic, elimination and addition reactions will also be covered

CHE324: Natural Products I
3 Credit(s)

This course introduces students to an in-depth study of the function and structural moiety of organic macromolecules of biological relevance. Topics to be discussed in this course will revolve around classification of carbohydrates, stereoisomerism in carbohydrates, polyfunctional chemistry of simple sugars, cellulose and its derivatives, enzymatic glycogen hydrolysis, conversion of ATP to ADP, and proteins (Classification, amino acids, peptides, determination of protein structure), nucleic acids, nucleosides, nucleotides, and synthetic polymers.

ESC 208: Methods of Teaching Biology
3 Credit(s)

This course requires student-teachers to scaffold learning; practice how to promote active engagement of the learner; expose and discuss common misconceptions; organize the syllabus into schemes of work and further into lesson notes; use assessment as a means of advancing learning; develop effective and interactive teaching techniques and styles; and use collaborative rich tasks to engage science students in co-operative small group work.

ESC 214: Curriculum Studies in Biology
3 Credit(s)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to discuss the Senior High School curriculum in biology, including the basic principles of curriculum development.  Students will be exposed to the factors that influence the development, design, implementation and evaluation of curriculum.

This course introduces students to the various theories of curriculum development. It covers the various factors that influence curriculum development. Students will learn how to select and organize learning experiences. Curriculum implementation and evaluation will be covered in this course. Students will be exposed to how to interpret the biology syllabus.

ESC 330: Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Biology II
3 Credit(s)

This is the second of two courses designed to equip students with pedagogical content knowledge to enable them teach new or perceived difficult topics in the senior high school biology syllabus more competently in a variety of ways to reflect students’ different learning styles. Students will be able to develop special amalgam of content and pedagogy that is uniquely the province of teachers.

Appropriate strategies for successful teaching of selected topics, generally, will be discussed. Students will also learn how to recognize opportunities where learners will be encouraged to develop their thinking skills as applied to the study of biology.

ESC210: Methods of Teaching Physics
3 Credit(s)

This course requires student-teachers to scaffold learning; practice how to promote active engagement of the learner; expose and discuss common misconceptions; organize the syllabus into schemes of work and further into lesson notes; use assessment as a means of advancing learning; develop effective and interactive teaching techniques and styles; and use collaborative rich tasks to engage science students in co-operative small group work.

The course specifically includes the following topics: Overview of theories of learning and teaching; principles of learning and teaching; various instructional strategies; creating a good teaching environment (including board management, class control and class management); motivation in science teaching; statement of lesson objectives and set induction; lesson  planning; questioning and questioning skills; learning difficulties in physics; practical work in physics; and use of ICT in teaching physics.

ESC220: Curriculum Studies in Physics
3 Credit(s)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to discuss the Senior High School curriculum in Physics, including the basic principles of curriculum development.  Students will be exposed to the factors that influence the development, design, implementation and evaluation of curriculum.

This course introduces students to the various theories of curriculum development. It covers the various factors that influence curriculum development. Students will learn how to select and organize learning experiences. Curriculum implementation and evaluation will be covered in this course. Students will be exposed to how to interpret the Physics syllabus.

ESC311: Assessment in Science Education
3 Credit(s)

The course is to equip students with the skills in assessing the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains of behaviours of their prospective science students. It will examine, among others, the general science assessment techniques, characteristics of good science tests, different types of science test items, and continuous assessment of science students. It will also take a critical look at the current modes of internal and external examinations in science in Ghana.

This course emphasizes the following: nature of assessment of students; goals and learning objectives of instruction; characteristics of tests in science; planning of classroom tests and assessments; construction and validation of science assessment instruments; providing  guidelines for assembling and administering classroom tests; item analysis; interpretation of test scores obtained from students; and development of science performance-based assessment instrument.

ESC313: Becoming a Reflective Science Teacher
3 Credit(s)

This course is aimed at helping students to combine practice and theory to become a reflective science teacher. It will enable students to become innovative and flexible in their teaching practice. It will also guide them to draw on knowledge and experience, and relate them to what they do in practice. 

ESC314: Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Physics II
3 Credit(s)

This is the second of two courses designed to equip students with pedagogical content knowledge to enable them teach new or perceived difficult topics in the senior high school physics syllabus more competently in a variety of ways to reflect students’ different learning styles. Students will be able to develop special amalgam of content and pedagogy that is uniquely the province of teachers.

Appropriate strategies for successful teaching of selected topics, generally, will be discussed. Students will also learn how to recognize opportunities where learners will be encouraged to develop their thinking skills as applied to the study of physics. 

ESC332: Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Chemistry II
3 Credit(s)

This is the second of two courses designed to equip students with pedagogical content knowledge to enable them teach new or perceived difficult topics in the senior high school chemistry syllabus more competently in a variety of ways to reflect students’ different learning styles. Students will be able to develop special amalgam of content and pedagogy that is uniquely the province of teachers.

Appropriate strategies for successful teaching of selected topics, generally, will be discussed. Students will also learn how to recognize opportunities where learners will be encouraged to develop their thinking skills as applied to the study of chemistry. 

ESC345: Computer Applications in Science Education
2 Credit(s)

The course provides trainees’ opportunities to develop their Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and skills to design, enact and evaluate ICT-based lessons using a variety of ICT tools that support different teaching and learning strategies. Students will also be able to use Predictive Analytics Software (PASW) in analyzing data.

This course emphasizes the following: Application of Microsoft Office Suits in science teaching; Using of ICT tools for active learning of science (Blogs, Mind mapping tools, Interactive Simulations); Demonstration of skills in ICT in the delivery of science lessons; and PASW.

ETP390: Instructional Laboratory Experience (ON-CTP)
3 Credit(s)

In this course, students learn specific skills in a non-threatening environment, get feedback from peers and supervisors. The specific teaching skills and practices include questioning techniques, use of the chalkboard and other audio-visual resources, systematic presentation and lesson closure. Also, opportunities are provided for students to observe good models of teaching through video presentations and demonstration of specific teaching techniques.

PHY 204: Electronics I
2 Credit(s)

This is a foundation course in analogue Electronics and is meant to provide a comprehensive overview of the scope and dynamics of electricity and the fact that electronic refers to a extremely wide range of electrical technology.  Students will be introduces to the building blocks of electronics such as the semiconductor, power supplies, operational amplifiers, attenuators and transducers.  Students will learn the theory and mathematics that govern the workings of the components that make up an electronic system.

 

PHY202: Electricity and Magnetism
2 Credit(s)

This course is an extension of the electricity and magnetism basics introduced in PHY102.  It is designed to improve students understanding of electric and magnetic phenomena.  The course covers basic computation of electric and magnetic fields, calculation of electric potentials and their applications.  A.C. theory and electromagnetic waves and their related calculations are covered. Application of RCL circuit is discussed.      

 

PHY208: Electronics I Practicals
1 Credit(s)

Electronics Experiments

PHY302: Classical Mechanics
3 Credit(s)

This course is concerned with the set of physical laws describing the motion of bodies under the action of a system of forces.  It describes the motion of macroscopic objects as well as astronomical objects.  It enables the student to make tangible connections between classical and modern physics – an indispensable part of a physicist’s education.

PHY304: Physical Optics (Theory/Practicals)
3 Credit(s)

Physical Optics shifts the treatment of propagation of light energy along straight-line segments (Geometrical Optics) to that which propagates as a wave and the consequences of the behavior this helps to account for important phenomena such as interference, diffraction and polarization. The course also lays the foundation for an understanding of such devices and concepts as interferometer, thin-film interference, antireflection (AR) coatings. Polarizes, quarter-wave plates. A laboratory component will run concurrently with the theory to provide hands-on experience with handling optical instruments.

Level 400

First Semester

BIO208: Population Genetics and Evolution
3 Credit(s)

Students are introduced to Polygenes and the Hardy-Weinberg law. The latter is illustrated by sickle cell anaemia, melanism in moths, drug resistance, insecticide resistance and mimicry in butterflies.  The course also examines the concept of evolution and the distribution of organisms in time and space.  It also reviews the theories of evolution, natural selection and evidence of evolutionary processes: fossils, geographical distribution, comparative anatomy, vestigial structures, molecular biology and embryology.  The origin of Man and the future of Man on earth are also discussed.

ESC313: Becoming a Reflective Science Teacher
3 Credit(s)

This course is aimed at helping students to combine practice and theory to become a reflective science teacher. It will enable students to become innovative and flexible in their teaching practice. It will also guide them to draw on knowledge and experience, and relate them to what they do in practice.

ESC345: Computer Applications in Science Education
2 Credit(s)

The course provides trainees’ opportunities to develop their Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and skills to design, enact and evaluate ICT-based lessons using a variety of ICT tools that support different teaching and learning strategies. Students will also be able to use Predictive Analytics Software (PASW) in analyzing data.

This course emphasizes the following: Application of Microsoft Office Suits in science teaching; Using of ICT tools for active learning of science (Blogs, Mind mapping tools, Interactive Simulations); Demonstration of skills in ICT in the delivery of science lessons; and PASW.

ESC499: Project Work
3 Credit(s)

Project work is to offer students the opportunity to demonstrate skills in conducting research on issues relevant to science education and writing it up. It also helps students to demonstrate independence of thought, initiative, analysis and organisation of data and presentation of scholarly research report. The project work will be written under the guidance of the student’s Supervisor.

ETP490: Educational Field Experience
12 Credit(s)

The course is the culminating activity of the professional education sequence.  Four weeks would be spent in selected off-campus school sites. While student-teaching, the teacher candidate is required to adhere to established policies and procedures of the school system in addition to those policies and procedures established by the University.  The clinical experience is designed to enable the teacher trainee to engage in competent reflective decision making while teaching, demonstrating professionalism, scholarship and sensitivity to individual and communal interests. Standards of good practice and ethical, professional behaviour as laid down by the GES should be maintained.

Second Semester

CHE412: Natural Products II
3 Credit(s)

This course seeks to promote understanding of the significance of natural products in terms of their biosynthesis, biological activity and chemical synthesis, combining organic chemistry and biological chemistry. It will focus on the diversity of natural products and their roles in biological systems, the chemistry and biosynthesis of the major natural products classes and the synthesis of important natural products. A special emphasis will be placed on how chemical structure affects the physiological function of various natural products.

CHE427B: Electrochemistry
3 Credit(s)

The course will focus on the treatment of electroanlytical methods (potentiometric, voltametric and polarographic methods) and the application of electromotive force measurement and activities in cell potential determination. Electrodes types and their fabrication, assessment of their performance characteristics related to sensitivity, selectivity coefficient, etc. will be reviewed.

EDF401: History and Management of Education in Ghana
3 Credit(s)

The course is in two parts. The first part deals with the role of government and non-governmental bodies in the development and growth of formal education in Ghana. The second part examines administration theories and their influence on the management and administration of school systems in Ghana.

EPS403: Guidance and Counselling
3 Credit(s)

This course recognizes that secondary school students need guidance to be able to attain their full potential and maximize the benefits of their educational experience. It attempts to equip the student with information that will enable him/her to facilitate this process in a secondary school setting. At the end of the course, students should be able to show a clear understanding of the guidance concept in the context of school personnel work, examine the principles under girding guidance practice, explore the services of a given guidance programme, show how they can be addressed and examine the role of guidance personnel.

ESC 311: Assessment in Science Education
3 Credit(s)

The course is to equip students with the skills in assessing the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains of behaviours of their prospective science students. It will examine, among others, the general science assessment techniques, characteristics of good science tests, different types of science test items, and continuous assessment of science students. It will also take a critical look at the current modes of internal and external examinations in science in Ghana.

This course emphasizes the following: nature of assessment of students; goals and learning objectives of instruction; characteristics of tests in science; planning of classroom tests and assessments; construction and validation of science assessment instruments; providing  guidelines for assembling and administering classroom tests; item analysis; interpretation of test scores obtained from students; and development of science performance-based assessment instrument.

ESC404: Contemporary Issues in Science Education
3 Credit(s)

The course examines some pressing issues in science education in Ghana. It also deals with current developments in science and technology which are of particular relevance to the teaching and learning of science in Ghanaian schools. 

Some of the topics to be discussed in this course are: Environmental science education; biotechnology; nuclear science teaching; integrated approach to science teaching; management and development of science laboratories; gender issues in science teaching and learning; and sociocultural issues in science education.

ESC407: Science, Technology and Society
3 Credit(s)

This course is meant to relate theoretical science to technology in the home and in the manufacturing sector. It will generate awareness and interest in industrial applications of science so that relevance and meaning can be brought into science teaching and learning. 

Topics to be covered are Science, Technology and Society(STS) Teaching Models, initiatives and reforms; The Concept of Indigenous Technology and Community Science; Indigenous Technology in Ghana (Traditional Soap making, palm oil extraction, fermentation processes and Akpeteshie production etc). Industrial Processes in Ghana (Crude oil, Gold, aluminum, and cocoa etc.).

ETP390: Instructional Laboratory Experience (ON-CTP)
3 Credit(s)

In this course, students learn specific skills in a non-threatening environment, get feedback from peers and supervisors. The specific teaching skills and practices include questioning techniques, use of the chalkboard and other audio-visual resources, systematic presentation and lesson closure. Also, opportunities are provided for students to observe good models of teaching through video presentations and demonstration of specific teaching techniques.

MBB406: Biotechnology
3 Credit(s)

Students are introduced to the application of microorganisms, biological systems, and processes to manufacturing and service industries. The course examines the role of micro-organisms in industrial, agricultural, and pharmaceutical processes; biologically produced sources of energy (single cell protein); waste management, mining, and other areas. The impact of genetic engineering, enzyme biotechnology, recent advances in genetics and physiology of industrial micro-organisms for strain development will be discussed

MBB414: Socio-Economic Concerns of Biosafety
3 Credit(s)

Communicating biosafety information: Communication skills, Communicating with target groups (e.g. farmers, legislators, media, regulators etc.), Other methods of disseminating information (e.g. fliers, brochures, workshops etc.), Socio-economics of Biosafety and biotechnology; Assessing the costs of Biosafety Regulations:  conceptual issues; Economics of Biotechnology, Economics of Biosafety (Cost of biosafety regulations and Strategic approaches to biosafety regulations (Trade, Labour, Socio-cultural issues); Non-biosafety issues (Bioethics).

PHY405: Electromagnetic Field Theory I
3 Credit(s)

Basic field concepts; Review of equations in electrostatics; Magnetostatics and electromagnetic induction; Maxwell’s equations; Electromagnetic wave equation; Poynting theorem; Reflection and refraction; Propagation in conducting and in ionized media; The ionosphere.

PHY412: Photonics/Laser Physics
3 Credit(s)

Principles; Properties; Pumping Process; Process; Optics Resources; Types of  Lasers; Output  Characteristics; Theory  of  Laser Oscillation. Laser modulation; demodulation, detection, Laser Applications in   metrology, holography medicine etc.