Degree Type: 

Bachelor of Arts

Department: 

Department of English

Programme Duration: 

4 years (Standard Entry)

Modes of Study: 

Regular

About Programme: 

Not Published

Entry Requirements: 

The minimum admission requirement into the University of Cape Coast for WASSCE applicants is aggregate 36. For SSSCE applicants, the minimum requirement is aggregate 24.

For the purpose of admission, a pass in

WASSCE means Grade: A1-C6

SSSCE means Grade: A-D

Career Opportunities: 

Not Published

Programme Structure

Level 100

First Semester

ENG 011: Intermediate Listing
4 Credit(s)

The course introduces students to the sound system of English. It considers listening to words in isolation and in connected speech. Emphasis will also be given to the comprehension of casual speech and careful speech and the structure of speech as aid to listening. Students will practice listening to individual speakers.

ENG 012: Intermediate Speaking
4 Credit(s)

The course introduces students to the pronunciation of English. It considers the pronunciation of words in isolation and in connected speech as well as pronunciation of grammatical forms such as plural forms, past tense forms, and possessive forms. It will also consider stress and intonation in phrases, sentences; statements and questions, highlighting parts of the sentence, conversations and discussions. Discourse strategies such as turn taking, signaling readiness to begin, ending; checking understanding; holding the floor; use of pauses and fillers, and asking for repetition will also be discussed and practiced. 

ENG 013: Intermediate Reading
4 Credit(s)

This course focuses on reading aloud, silent reading, reading for information, and reading for enjoyment. Readings will be drawn from short stories and extracts from the newspaper and magazines. Students will be guided to use the dictionary in reading.

ENG 014: Intermediate Writing
4 Credit(s)

This course introduces students to basic writing skills in English for both academic and non-academic purposes. The course will consider issues relating to accuracy in writing such as the sentence and its parts; simple, coordinate and complex sentences; agreement within sentences; joining sentences, pronouns, using words with similar meanings to avoid repetition; the past tense and time adverbs; and use of words in writing. Students will also be introduced to techniques in writing simple stories; the personal letter; describing events, people and places; and paragraph development.

ENG 101: The Use of English
3 Credit(s)

This course develops both oral and writing skills of learners in English as a second language.  It reinforces and further develops skills in comprehension, summary and paraphrasing, using texts from a variety of sources, and introduces the student to the basic theory of the production of English sounds.

Second Semester

ENG 021: Advanced Listening
4 Credit(s)

This course is a follow-up on ENG 011 and it focuses on listening to speech in real and simulated situations. Areas to be covered include discussion by more than two speakers, signals of agreement and disagreement; listening to public speech; evaluating speech, listening to highlights, telephone conversation, lectures, and radio and television news.

ENG 022: Advanced Speaking
4 Credit(s)

This course is a follow-up on ENG 012 and it focuses on more advanced skills in speaking. The course will introduce students to polite forms of speech; highlighting in speech; formal and informal speech; deliberate and rapid speech; persuasion argumentation; public speech, anecdotes, jokes, quoting and referring to sources of information, structuring speech. Students will be involved in a lot of practice work.

ENG 023: Advanced Reading
4 Credit(s)

The course is a follow-up on ENG 013 and it consolidates and advances students reading skills. Students will be guided to read for enjoyment and reading for information. Students will also be introduced to different reading skills such as skimming and scanning; and using contextual information to guess the meaning of new words and expressions. They will also be guided to study the connotative and denotative meaning of words. Texts for reading will include novels, textbooks and scientific reports.

ENG 024: Advanced Writing
4 Credit(s)

This course is a follow-up on ENG 014 and it aims to consolidate and further develop students’ writing skills. It guides students in developing skills in interactive writing; business letter writing; writing paragraphs: topic sentences and supporting sentences; and writing different types of essays.

ENG 112: Principles of Prose Fiction
3 Credit(s)

This introductory course involves the definition and recognition of the tools for appreciating texts.  The focus here is on prose fiction, and the elements to be examined include character and characterization, story and plot, tropes, setting etc.  Students will be guided to do a close analysis of selected literary works as the basis of effective critical writing.

Level 200

First Semester

ENG 203: The Sentence and its Parts
3 Credit(s)

This course is an introduction to the study of the sentence and its parts. The aspects that will be covered include the morpheme, word, the phrase and basic verb patterns. The purpose of the course is to help students to identify the parts that come together to form a sentence, and their functions.

Second Semester

ENG 204: Forms and Functions of the English Clause
3 Credit(s)

This course is a continuation of ENG 203. It deals with the forms and functions of clause types, with emphasis on co-ordination and subordination, and their stylistic effects on composition. The main clause types to be studied are the nominal, relative/adjectival, and adverbial clauses.

ENG 214: The Techniques of Poetry
3 Credit(s)

The focus of this course is the nature of poetry.  It will discuss the various characteristics of poetry; including form, structure and function, and the tropes of poetry. Other elements to be discussed include imagination, beauty, emotion and perception. Illustrative material will be drawn from Ghanaian, African and non-African texts. 

Level 300

First Semester

ENG 399: Research Methods
3 Credit(s)

This course is designed to prepare students to write their fourth year long essays.  (It is a required course for major students and an elective course for combined students.)This course introduces students to the basic tenets and practices of conducting research in the humanities. The course will focus on both library and field research.  By the end of the course, it is expected that students would be equipped with the necessary skills to formulate a topic, collect the required data and provide an analysis of data.

Second Semester

ENG 304: English in Multilingual Context.
3 Credit(s)

The course looks at the different forms and functions of English in communities that have other languages genetically unrelated to English as first language.  Topics to be treated include the growth of English as a world language, the emergence of new English as a world language, the emergence of new Englishes, perceptions of non-native varieties of English, the relationship between English and indigenous languages, and samples of Ghanaian English.

ENG 306: Aspects of the Grammar of English
3 Credit(s)

This course builds on the clause as an organic part of the sentence, sentence types and the use of sentences in text are highlighted with the view to developing the writing and oral skills of the students in the domains in which they need English in their studies and after graduation. 

ENG 314: Studies in Shakespeare
3 Credit(s)

This course introduces students to a selection of the works of Shakespeare with emphasis on Shakespeare’s dramatic technique, themes, characterization and language as well as his contribution to poetry. The course guides Ghanaian students to read Shakespeare’s works with an appreciation of the historical, cultural and linguistic differences represented in the texts to be studied. Preference is, therefore, given to texts that, in addition to explaining universal themes, have something to say about the African condition. 

ENG 318: Gender & Writing
3 Credit(s)

This is a course that seeks to determine some of the concerns of a selection of representative African women writers.  It will examine literary writers from West, Southern, and North Africa, with the intention of determining the forms by which these writers deploy the issues of major focus.  The two central subjects that will engage our attention will include class and gender, with an emphasis on the power relations that underpin them. We hope to establish the literary ways by which these subjects are fictionalized in the writing of the selected writers.

ENG 319: Canonical American Literature
3 Credit(s)

This course looks at a few of the important colonial writers – Williams Bradstreed, Wheatly - and follows the growth of American literature from independence in 1776 through the writing produced in the turbulence of the Civil Rights era. Attention is given to well-known American writers such as Dickinson, Whitman, Melville, Twain, and Ellison. Other authors include Toni Morrison, Walt Whitman and Richard Wright. The course also looks at the American vernacular, the effects of slavery, and the role of the individual on the formation of American literature 

 

Level 400

First Semester

ENG 403: Literary Stylistics
3 Credit(s)

This course generally explores the interface between language and literature. The course guides students to combine the descriptive procedures of linguistics and the interpretative goals of literary criticism in analyzing literary texts. It is designed to focus students’ attention on the linguistic organization of selected literary texts and more importantly the literary significance of the linguistic organization of the texts. Areas to be covered include concepts and methods of stylistics, the historical developments in stylistics, and the relationship between literary discourse and non-literary discourse. Students will essentially be engaged in discussing characterization, theme, and style in prose, drama and poetry through linguistic analysis at various levels, including lexico-grammar, graphology, phonetics and phonology, semantics, and pragmatics.

ENG 412 : Oral Literature in Africa
3 Credit(s)

The objective of this course is to acquaint students with the topography of oral literature           (orature) in Africa. Some of the theoretical and genre related problems in the area will be considered with a view to classifying the essentially literary nature of our subject.

ENG 415: Ghanaian Literature
3 Credit(s)

This survey course explores aspects of Ghanaian literature from its earliest manifestations to the more recent publications.  It looks at types, themes and trends in Ghanaian literature. The course will begin with a broad overview of verbal and non-written literary expressions in order to provide a framework for discussion and appreciation.  It will proceed to critically evaluate written and imaginative literary works by selected writers from Ghana, in the light of their oral and historical origins as well as their literary antecedents.

ENG 431: Major European Writers
3 Credit(s)

This course explores the influential prose written in Europe, exclusive of the British Isles. Beginning with the growth of the novel in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the course will proceed through the rise of Romanticism to the tensions surrounding the two European Wars (1914 – 1917, 1939 – 1945), culminating in the literature in the Europe divided by the politics of the Cold War. All works will be read in translation.

ENG. 401: Theories & Practice of Grammar
3 Credit(s)

The course is concerned with the theory and practice of grammatical descriptions. It will examine traditions of grammar including Traditional Grammar, Structuralist Grammar, Transformational Grammar, and Systemic Functional Grammar.

ENG. 401A: Structure and Style
3 Credit(s)

It introduces students to grammar in discourse. It explores the choices that are available to the user of English in various aspects of language use by focusing on more complex aspect of linguistic forms. In this way students are enabled to understand the relationship between the structure of English language and the available linguistic choices in both academic and non-academic context.   The course covers issues that should develop the writing and oral skills of students in the domains of the use English in their studies and after graduation.  

Second Semester

ENG 402: Varieties of English & Advanced Writing skill
3 Credit(s)

This course is intended to help students to distinguish varieties of English by analyzing the linguistic patterning of texts.  It is also expected to improve students’ own writing in different situations. Hence, the course will be very practical with exercises on analyzing and writing business letters, reports, minutes, and speeches. It encourages students to distinguish varieties of English, which are dialects.  Other distinctions depending on mode, tenor and domain will be studied. The emphasis will be on analyzing and producing texts of different varieties, which perform different functions, such as expressive, formal, informal, spoken and written.

ENG 404: History of English (Compulsory for major students
3 Credit(s)

The course seeks to highlight the major landmarks in the history of the English language that have made English the most outstanding international language. The course therefore engages a chronology of the evolution of English Language by examining the following periods: the Germanic Period, the Old or Anglo-Saxon Period, Middle English,  and the Period of Modern English; the notion of Lingua Franca is also studied, and the course finally shows that today’s English is related to the phenomenon of Language Mixing because although Germanic by origin ( vocabulary and Grammar), todays’ English is comprises words borrowed from hundreds of other languages.

ENG 405: Error & Contrastive Analysis
3 Credit(s)

The course attempts to introduce students to the scientific study of recurrent errors made by second language learners of English.  Special emphasis will be given to the nature of the similarities and differences between English and L1 systems. The pedagogical significance of error and contrastive analysis will be examined in detail.

ENG 411: Literary Criticism
3 Credit(s)

In a sweeping movement from the Greek classification to contemporary African literature, this course explores the theoretical, philosophical, historical and ideological foundations of literary criticism and practice. It considers such received principles as the immanent history of literature, the nature of art, concepts of beauty in art, and the creative process in literature. The course guides students to reflect on the practice of art and criticism by considering a selection of canonical texts from Aristotle and Achebe to Tolstoy and Woolf.

ENG 435: Theoretical Development in Drama
3 Credit(s)

This course discusses the development of dramatic theory from the period of the Ancient Greeks to the present. It aims to acquaint students with the changing theoretical bases of the genre from Greek tragedy to later dramatic forms like the theatre of the absurd, the various types of comedy, and modern tragedy. Representative texts will be used for illustration.

ENG 436: Structure and Themes in Prose Fiction
3 Credit(s)

The course focuses on the particular contributions by selected Western Writers to the twentieth century Novel. The objective is to place the achievements of these writers within the broad spectrum of Modern Prose Fiction.

ENG 437: Thematic Exploration in Poetry
3 Credit(s)

This course examines poetry from the period of the Romantics to the present.  The focus will be on the changing trends in thematic and stylistic concerns over the period. Although the salient themes in the poems under study are the core of this course, other elements like the following are also considered: the structure, language, and cultural references that characterize the poems.

ENG 499: Long Essay
3 Credit(s)

This course is a practical course in research in English language and literature. Students will be guided to select research topics and to plan and execute a research project in a chosen area of interest. Students are required to produce a research report at the end of the semester for assessment.